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Emerson in hybrid laser analyzer

Written by  AOG Staff Sunday, 08 May 2016 19:23
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Emerson has released the Rosemount CT5100 continuous gas analyzer, to combine tunable diode laser and quantum cascade laser (QCL) measurement technologies for process gas analysis and emissions monitoring.

The CT5100 is the latest offering in the Emerson CT5000 series. It can detect down to sub ppm level for a range of components, while simplifying operation and reducing costs. Unlike traditional continuous gas analyzers, the CT5100 can measure up to 12 critical component gases and potential pollutants simultaneously within a single system.

CT5100 operates with no consumables, no in-field enclosure, and a simplified sampling system that does not require any gas conditioning to remove moisture. It is ideally suited for process gas analysis, continuous emissions monitoring, and ammonia slip applications.

“The increase in regulatory requirements worldwide, along with the decrease in experienced personnel in industrial plants, have paved the way for the emergence of a new generation of faster, more accurate, and easier-to-use measurement technologies,” said Ruth Lindley, product manager for QCL analyzers at Emerson.

“The CT5100 represents an important next step in that direction, providing unmatched sub-second response time for precise, reliable measurement of complex gases and emissions to ensure regulatory compliance and prevent costly fines or unexpected shutdowns.”

The CT5100 is a unique combination of advanced technology, high reliability, and rugged design. Its laser chirp technique expands gas analysis in both the near- and mid-infrared range, enhancing process insight, improving overall gas analysis sensitivity and selectivity, removing cross interference, and reducing response time.

The laser chirp technique produces sharp, well-defined peaks from high resolution spectroscopy that enable specificity of identified components with minimum interference and without filtration, reference cells, or chemometric manipulations.

 
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